none

Robots will not take manufacturing jobs: new report

16-04-2014
by 
in 

Robots will not take over manufacturing jobs, but enhance future employment opportunities, according to a landmark report on production in Australia.
But as demand for workers with a higher level of skills grows, some workers will find themselves at risk of displacement.
"Lightweight assistive systems will facilitate humans' work in factories, resulting in jobs with more high-value tasks and fewer repetitive tasks and physically demanding activities such as weight-lifting and tool-picking," the report by the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency says.
"Integrating new technologies such as in mechanical and electrical manufacturing will mean that workers need skills to operate and manage computerised and technological advances in machinery and equipment.
"These changes will put pressure on parts of the existing workforce, particularly those in lower skilled or manual roles. As demand for workers with higher-level skills grows, some workers will find themselves at risk of displacement, particularly if they work in a sector which is contracting, or in a lower-skilled occupation."
The report warns that Australia is lagging behind other countries in forging links with the higher education sector and its employment of graduates.
It says deeper engagement between manufacturers and universities is needed to supply the skilled graduates, research and expertise that will be needed to help the industry make the transition it needs to remain viable.
Despite the recent announced closures of car manufacturers Ford, GM Holden, Toyota as well as Alcoa and Electrolux, the report says manufacturing still has a crucial, albeit smaller, role to play in the Australian economy.
Manufacturing's contribution to the Australian economy is less than half what it was four decades ago.
The report says Australia has been innovative and competitive in low-to-medium-technology manufacturing.
Growth in high-end manufacturing will require a stronger focus on advanced manufacturing technologies and knowledge-based services.
Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency chief executive officer Robin Shreeve said traditional manufacturing jobs such as high-end welding would still be needed to build equipment for the government, such as submarines.
"If manufacturing in Australia in the future is going to be more about pharmaceuticals and food processing than car assembly, we need the people with the skills who can work in those new subsectors of the industry," Mr Shreeve said.
"I think what we're going to see is a broad spectrum of manufacturing in Australia, but the balance will shift to newer areas and won't be so dominated by the traditional areas which we grew up with."

Source: Fairfax Media

Related news & editorials

  1. 29.07.2021
    29.07.2021
    by      In
    Epson and subsidiary Epson X Investment Corporation are together investing in SiLC Technologies, a start-up developing on-chip LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) modules to measure distance to surrounding objects and their speed.
    The investment is occurring via the EP-GB Investment Limited... Read More
  2. 27.07.2021
    27.07.2021
    by      In
    The past weekend saw the launch of a new campaign from Bapcor, Asia Pacific’s leading provider of vehicle parts, accessories, equipment and service. The campaign, called The unseen parts of every Australian journey, focuses on the role the firm plays in the lives of ordinary Australians.
    Coinciding... Read More
  3. 27.07.2021
    27.07.2021
    by      In
    Entries are closing soon for the Premier’s Sustainability Awards 2021, Victoria’s annual sustainability awards program.
    With less than a week to apply, the awards recognise and celebrate individuals, organisations and communities that are contributing to Victoria’s long term sustainability efforts... Read More
  4. 27.07.2021
    27.07.2021
    by      In
    Whereas the world’s first industrial robot was brought to life in 1962, it wasn’t until 2008 that the first collaborative robot (cobot) made its way onto the scene. As the name suggests, a cobot is a robot that is intended for direct human-robot interaction within a shared space. These robots are... Read More
Products
Suppliers