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OLYMPUS 3D VIDEOSCOPE SET TO REVOLUTIONISE SURGERY

22-07-2015
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in 

The world's only HD 3D videolaparoscope with a deflectable tip, manufactured by Olympus, improves depth perception and viewing angles to enable surgeons to complete minimally invasive surgery faster and more accurately.

The Olympus 3D system was recently recognised as a finalist in the 2015 Medical Technology Association of New Zealand (MTANZ) Innovation Awards.

"We're proud that our investment in R&D and innovation will have a positive impact on patients and surgeons in the region and are honoured to be recognised by the judging panel," said Oliver Clarke, Communications Manager, Olympus New Zealand and Australia.

The system features technological breakthroughs that resolve several of the issues associated with traditional 2D rod lens laparoscope systems.

In a rod lens laparoscope, light must travel through a number of lenses and an air gap to reach the charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensor.

This results in degradation of the signal received by the CCD and therefore the picture viewed by the surgeon.

The 2D systems also lack the ability to provide depth perception, making it difficult for surgeons to perform routine tasks such as suturing, grasping and cutting tissue.

The Olympus 3D system eliminates these problems by replacing the surgical camera and laparoscope with two CCD chips located on the end of an integrated flexible laparoscope.

This eliminates the need for an air gap and multiple lenses.

This results in a crisp, accurate image, which provides surgeons with a 3D view of the anatomy with a depth perception equivalent to viewing it with their own eyes.

Studies have shown that the Olympus 3D system saves time during critical surgical tasks such as suturing, therefore reducing the duration of the procedure.

The system also incorporates a flexible tip, which can be manoeuvred by the surgeon to improve the viewing angle, allowing them to literally see around corners without the need to reposition the camera during surgery.

This flexible tip offers another advantage compared with other 3D systems: the ability to retain a level viewing horizon at all times.

Traditional systems use an angled tip, which is rotated by the surgeon to provide different perspectives. This results in the image rotating on the screen. “The unique flexible tip keeps the image upright at all times,” explained Clarke.

“This ensures there is no disorientation and every precious second is maximised.”

 

Olympus Australia

Ph: 03 9271 5508

http://www.olympusaustralia.com.au

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