none

NEW TECH MONITORS YOUR HEALTH THROUGH SWEAT

03-02-2016
by 
in 

Fitness and health awarness has seen a tremendous boost in the last few years, with apps and devices created to help you minter your fitness.

Scientists are saying however, that we are neglecting an important source of health data: sweat.

Researchers in the US have now developed an electronic sensor that provides continuous and non-invasive monitoring of a number of biochemicals in sweat, saying that many keys to ones fitness levels can be unlocked by looking at the metabolites and electrolytes in sweat,

"Human sweat contains physiologically rich information, thus making it an attractive body fluid for non-invasive wearable sensors," said Ali Javey, an electrical engineer and computer scientist at the University of California (UC Berkeley).

"[We] have developed a fully integrated system that simultaneously and selectively measures multiple sweat analytes, and wirelessly transmits the processed data to a smartphone."

"When studying the effects of exercise on human physiology, we typically take blood samples," said exercise physiologist George Brooks. "With this non-invasive technology, someday it may be possible to know what's going on physiologically without needle sticks or attaching little, disposable cups on you."

The prototype of the new tech includes five sensors on a flexible circuit board, with the sensors measuring metabolites (glucose and lactate) and electrolytes (sodium and potassium), and also monitors skin temperature, and the circuit board analysing the data, and transmits it to other devices.

The researchers claims that unlike the Fitbit and Jawbones, the sensors provides a platform for sweat-based health technology, with the potential to be used as a serous clinical tool, helping physicians and scientists to monitor biochemical levels.  

"We can easily shrink this device by integrating all the circuit functionalities into a single chip," said one of the team, Sam Emaminejad.

The sensors can be worn constantly, meaning that is can collect a constant stream of health data.

"We wanted to move from the kind of cumbersome equipment used in a clinic to a light, wearable device that could deliver continuous measurements," said Emaminejad.

The aim of the research is claimed to be a device that everyone can wear to assist doctors to assess the health of a patient.

Related news & editorials

  1. 19.07.2018
    19.07.2018
    by      In
    Leuze electronic has come up with a novel process called Smart Process Gating (SPG) that it reckons makes it more economical, simpler and safer to implement muting processes.
    When safety sensors such as light curtains are used to detect unauthorised intrusions in applications such as intralogistics... Read More
  2. 19.07.2018
    19.07.2018
    by      In
    RS Components is expanding the reach of its RS Pro brand with the addition of a line of switch-mode power supplies. The range comprises more than 80 chassis-mount supplies with power ratings from 15 to 1000W and single DC outputs from 5 to 48V.
    The outputs are regulated within ±10%, with ripple and... Read More
  3. 18.07.2018
    18.07.2018
    by      In
    Available now from Control Logic, the versatile Tru-Trac encoder features a novel adjustable spring-tensioned mounting with the option of either a rubber or aluminium wheel and can be used for tracking velocity, position and distance over a wide variety of surfaces.
    The preassembled Tru-Trac... Read More
  4. 18.07.2018
    18.07.2018
    by      In
    Available now from W&B Instruments, the Status Instruments DM670 series of pressure and temperature indicators are ideal for applications in food, beverage and brewing industries. The UK-made indicators include advanced features such as logging, relay outputs and user configurable text display... Read More