none
none

NEW IRIS SCANNER CAN DETECT YOUR EYE 12M AWAY

08-07-2015
by 
in 

US researchers have developed a new iris scanner that can work at a distance of 12m.

The new device from the team at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) can spot and identify a driver seated in a car whether you're travelling through a toll bridge or exceeding the speed limit. The cameras will know who you are.

That brings up a whole series of difficult questions about user privacy and the capabilities of law enforcement agencies across the world.

Given a positive spin, it means a dangerous criminal can be spotted and identified before committing a crime or more cynically, the technology could be used to track citizens without their knowledge.

This long-range iris scanning system is primarily the work of CMU engineering professor, Marios Savvides.

As our irises are as distinctive as our fingerprints, the technology is very accurate. But as with fingerprints, your eyeballs will already need to be on file for you to be spotted.

Professor Savvides thinks the technology is more helpful than sinister.

"Fingerprints, they require you to touch something. Iris, we can capture it at a distance, so we're making the whole user experience much less intrusive, much more comfortable," he told The Atlantic recently.

"There's no X-marks-the-spot. There's no place you have to stand. Anywhere between six and 12m, it will find you, it will zoom in and capture both irises and full face."

If nothing else, it could speed up queues at the airport.

But in the wrong hands or used in the wrong way, it could be just as dangerous as it is convenient.

There's no chance of these types of biometric technology going backwards, so rigorous laws on how it can be used become increasingly important.

Professor Savvides thinks we're already in a new era of surveillance, and that his invention won't change that. "People are being tracked," he says.

"Their every move, their purchasing, their habits, where they are every day, through credit card transactions, through advantage cards - if someone really wanted to know what you were doing every moment of the day, they don't need facial recognition or iris recognition to do that. That's already out there."

Like many recent advancements in biometrics, increased convenience and accuracy comes at a cost – it’s all a question of how the technology is used.

Just don't be surprised if in the near future your office door spots you well before you reach it.

Related news & editorials

  1. 20.02.2018
    20.02.2018
    by      In
    Thousands of visitors, exhibitors, and speakers from around the world are expected to attend National Manufacturing Week (NMW), to be held from 9th to 11th May 2018 at the Sydney Showground.
    With registrations now open, the free-to-attend event will offer unrivalled access to world-class speakers... Read More
  2. 20.02.2018
    20.02.2018
    by      In
    An in-depth analysis of the battery industry in Australia has shown that lithium totals a $2 trillion investment opportunity, and despite investment in other kinds of battery technology, Australia must act or be left behind in lithium tech. 
    The Association of Mining and Exploration Companies (AMEC... Read More
  3. 20.02.2018
    20.02.2018
    by      In
    Lockheed Martin Australia has opened a new $12 million Lockheed Martin Australia House on the edge of Canberra’s Parliamentary Triangle. 
    The new office was opened by Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne, who said the company has cemented its ongoing commitment to Australia's defence industry... Read More
  4. 20.02.2018
    20.02.2018
    by      In
    Expressions of interest have now opened for trade works on the Osborne Naval Shipbuilding Precinct infrastructure project, promising up to 600 new construction jobs, and ongoing maintenance procedures. 
    Under the project, new facilities will be required to support the continuous build programs for... Read More