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HONEYWELL FILES SUIT FOR MASSIVE PATENT INFRINGEMENT

24-01-2017
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"Fair competition means respecting the patent rights of others," says Lisa London, President of Honeywell's Productivity Products business.

Honeywell has today filed a lawsuit against Utah-based Code Corp, alledging repeated infringement of six Honeywell patents involving scanning and productivity solutions.

Code Corp, who are primarily manufactures bar code readers, are accused of infringing six specific Honeywell patents that involve Honeywell's barcode scanning technology:

  • U.S. Patent No. 6,039,258: "Hand-held portable data collection terminal system"
  • U.S. Patent No. 6,249,008: "Code reader having replaceable optics assemblies supporting multiple illuminators"
  • U.S. Patent No. 6,491,223: "Autodiscriminating Optical Reader"
  • U.S. Patent No. 6,538,413: "Battery pack with capacity and pre-removal indicators"
  • U.S. Patent No. 6,607,128: "Optical assembly for bar code scanner"
  • U.S. Patent No. 8,096,472: "Image sensor assembly for optical reader"

The patents involved in the lawsuit are for Honeywell innovations that make bar code readers easier to use and operate faster and more accurately.

"Honeywell has and continues to invest millions of dollars in developing new, innovative products and offerings," said Lisa London, President of Honeywell's Productivity Products business.

"We welcome competition, but we have zero tolerance for those who infringe our intellectual property. Protecting patents is critical to ensuring a level playing field for all market players."

"We helped pioneer the bar code scanning market in the 1970s, and over the years our new innovations have helped thousands of retailers, distributors, healthcare organisations and industrial users achieve significant improvements in efficiency, speed and accuracy in their operations," London said. "Fair competition means respecting the patent rights of others."

The lawsuit seeks to prevent Code from using Honeywell's patented technology in its bar code readers, including the CR2600, and to recover damages caused by the infringement.

 

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