none

HELPING INNOVATIVE COMPANIES COMMERCIALISE THEIR PRODUCTS

13-02-2020
by 
in 

Right across our nation there are innovative manufacturers showcasing the best in Aussie ingenuity: businesses expanding their horizons through new technology, while offering practical hands-on job opportunities in seemingly traditional industries.

A small Queensland company that has developed a range of innovative devices to help fight bushfires is a prime example of how great ideas can reap benefits locally while having an eye to international markets.

It is the sort of company the Morrison Government is determined to support: a local business manufacturing a product that can help Australians, employ local people, source components locally, but also export to the world.

Helitak Fire Fighting Equipment provides solutions to help fight fires, both here at home and overseas.

Established in 2006, the manufacturer employs locals to build its inventions and its workforce is expected to grow from about 13 now to 50 by the end of the year.

Among Helitak’s inventions is a retractable underbelly water tank for helicopters that does not require modifications to the aircraft’s undercarriage.

It sources more than 85 per cent of the components of the underbelly tanks from southeast Queensland businesses, and the tanks themselves are manufactured locally.

The chief designer and engineer is Helitak CEO Jason Schellaars, a helicopter fire-fighting pilot.

Jason wanted to create a way to accurately release water to the fire ground as soon as possible and came up with a retractable tank concept.

In January I had the pleasure of visiting Helitak’s factory in Noosaville on the Sunshine Coast to announce that the company had been awarded $497,500 as part of our Government’s Accelerating Commercialisation grants programme.

The grant will help Helitak commercialise a tank developed for Airbus Super Puma helicopters, bringing the project to international markets.

It will also help secure the intellectual property rights, ensuring that the manufacture of component parts can remain in Australia.

The Super Puma helicopter tank can fill with 4200 litres of water or fire retardant in less than 50 seconds and drop the entire load or lesser amounts of water or fire retardant as required.

Helicopters can take off and land with Helitak Fire Tanks attached, and they are much safer in flying over urban areas than helicopters using the traditional bucket design.

The value of such a device to Australia is obvious. This sort of technology could make a vital difference in fighting the sort of devastating bushfires that have ravaged large areas of eastern Australia. But the device also has strong demand in international markets.

The Morrison Government is always looking to support innovative products from businesses with strong commercial and export prospects that provide local jobs and benefits.

These are businesses thinking big and outside the box, at the same time as creating opportunities for manufacturing workers and local supply chains.

Karen Andrews is Minister for Industry, Science and Technology.

Related news & editorials

  1. 20.10.2020
    20.10.2020
    by      In
    It was touted as a major boon for Australian manufacturing, yet the 2020 Budget would appear to be nothing more than a back to the future moment, spruiking Labor’s plan for jobs first announced in 2012.
     A big ticket item was the announcement of six priority areas for investment. While we welcome... Read More
  2. 20.10.2020
    20.10.2020
    by      In , In
    In his Budget speech, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg announced that the federal government would introduce a new round of changes to the Research and Development Tax Incentive.
    Industry Update’s readers will know that I have long been concerned about a Morrison government bill aimed at cutting $1.8... Read More
  3. 20.10.2020
    20.10.2020
    by      In
    In a world that has been shaken and changed by COVID-19, Australians are understandably concerned about where to from here.
    However, history has shown that through adversity, greatness can be borne. As Australians, it’s something we know too well.
    And so it is with Australian manufacturing. Our... Read More
  4. 11.09.2020
    11.09.2020
    by      In , In
    As we entered 2020, nothing could have prepared Australians that we were set to face economic turmoil not seen since the Great Depression, borne out of a global virus.
    While we don’t know the precise effects of this virus nor in turn the economic consequences, what we do know is that we are... Read More