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HEIGHT SAFETY IN THE WORKPLACE

29-11-2016
by 
in 

Height safety is extremely important for businesses in all kinds of industries.

In their 2015/2016 annual report, Worksafe Victoria released data showing that workplace injuries had fallen to record lows in the state.

The report stated that there were 6.95 claims per million hours of work, down from 7.34 claims per million hours in 2014/2015.

WorkSafe Victoria CEO, Clare Amies, said that the result was a credit to the efforts of employers and employees.

However, business owners and OHS officers need to ensure that they do not become complacent. Safe Work Australia recently reported that employers, particularly in small businesses, need support to improve workplace safety compliance.

The report examined how employers and managers perceived their own approach to workplace safety. It stated that most employers perceived that they “managed health and safety empowerment and justice well and frequently in their businesses”.

However, up to one-quarter of employers believed that they did not frequently empower their workers through active consultation about safety. Small businesses were more likely to be in this group.

Height safety is just one area in which businesses owners need to ensure that their premises are compliant with safety standards. Given that falls from heights carry the risk of significant injury or death, it is a safety issue that should not be overlooked under any circumstances.

According to Cameron Gelly, director of Australian Height Safety Services, it is surprisingly common for businesses to have non-compliant height safety systems and equipment.

Generally speaking, if personnel must work or travel at a height of two metres or higher, or within two metres of a fall edge, some form of height safety equipment is required.

The specific types of height safety systems needed to achieve compliance must be determined and installed by height safety industry professionals.

Workplace safety compliance requires the active engagement of employers and employees. Any concerns about height safety or any other workplace hazards must be addressed immediately.

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