none

GRID STABILISATION FOR A TOWN

24-05-2018
by 
in 

A new reactive battery system has been switched on, stabilising the power grid of a coastal town with wildly variable energy demands.

The autonomous system is located in the fishing village of Cape Jervis, and is part of a $3.65 million power stabilisation trial that could lead to town batteries being installed in other remote communities.

Cape Jervis is a small town with a population of about 300 people at the tip of the Fleurieu Peninsula about 100km south of the South Australian capital Adelaide.
However, the town’s population grows dramatically during the summer holiday season.

Cape Jervis also has a high proportion of rooftop PV solar, which adds volatility to the grid because of large variances in weather conditions and electricity supply and demand throughout the year.

The new stabilisation system aims to fix these issues, and is built around a 270kWh lithium-ion grid-connected battery that receives control signals from the nearby high-voltage electricity line.

The Internet of Things-capable control system reduces peak load of the local substation, stabilises the electricity network in the area, and supports a number of nearby customers in the event of a power interruption.

Connected parallel to the grid, the battery is charged by excess power generated by the town’s rooftop PV systems or the grid, depending on availability. The stored electricity is then released at times of peak demand or when grid power is not available, such as during a blackout.

Associate Professor Nesimi Ertugrul, from the University of Adelaide’s School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, said the volatility created by too much solar energy being pushed to the grid in times of low demand or during times of high peak demand and low solar generation destabilised the system, particularly in remote sections of the grid.

“This technology is novel because the mobile battery energy storage system’s operations are now completely autonomous,” Prof Ertugrul said.

“We can monitor the system and intervene if necessary, but the system can operate safely in all kinds of situations without the need for any operator instructions."

The project is a collaboration between the University of Adelaide, SA Power Networks and system supplier PowerTec. It is supported by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) on behalf of the Australian Government with $1.44 million in grant funding.

Related news & editorials

  1. 16.10.2018
    16.10.2018
    by      In
    The Government has unveiled a $5 million scheme to encourage high-quality graduate engineers to work in Australia’s automotive sector. The Automotive Engineering Graduate Programme aims to increase the level of advanced engineering skills in the sector and is part of the $100 million Advanced... Read More
  2. 15.10.2018
    15.10.2018
    by      In
    Industry Update is delighted to announce that we are expanding our video offerings with a new series of tutorial style videos that perfectly complement our existing library of news style videos.
    In the first series, we are partnering with sensor specialist VEGA to publish eight playlists of videos... Read More
  3. 15.10.2018
    15.10.2018
    by      In
    Kennards Hire is certainly “doing its bit” to help Australia’s drought stricken farmers and their families. The work began with the Kennards branch network throwing itself behind the Buy a Bale initiative, and is now continuing with a key role in the Mega Farm Rescue.
    Kennards Hire team members... Read More
  4. 15.10.2018
    15.10.2018
    by      In
    The Adelaide Convention Centre is set to host some of the world’s leading researchers and practitioners in the field of corrosion prevention and management. Corrosion & Prevention 2018 will run from 11th to 14th November, combing a high-quality technical programme with a 60-plus exhibitor trade... Read More