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GOOGLE PLANS TO BRING 5G ON THE WINGS OF SOLAR DRONES

04-02-2016
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Google is at it again, this time with 5G data. Out in New Mexico Google has been trailing it’s new 5G internet-compatible drones that can transmit gigabits of data every second, this is 40 times faster than the world’s fastest WiFi.

The project called Skybender, aims to take advantage of high frequency millimetre waves, which can transmit data more efficiently.

"The huge advantage of millimetre wave is access to new spectrum, because the existing cellphone spectrum is overcrowded. It’s packed and there’s nowhere else to go," electrical engineer Jacques Rudell from the University of Washington, who’s not involved in the project, told Mark Harris at The Guardian. 

The issue with wireless commnication is that every kind of communication platform such as radio, TV, phone, etc. has its own wavelength or frequency, and need their own “channel” to prevent interference.

However, with more information, the bandwidth us f

But the more information that needs to be transmitted, the more of the “prime” region of the electromagnetic spectrum will be taken up, so for faster speeeds, we need to expand.

The Engineering and Technology History Wiki explains:

"For example, a telephone conversation requires only about 6 kHz of bandwidth, while a TV broadcast, which carries much larger amounts of information, requires about 6 MHz. (A kilohertz, is 1,000 cycles per second; a megahertz is 1 million cycles per second). Increases in the amount of information transmitted require the use of higher frequencies. This is where millimetre waves come in."

Although this technology sounds promising, millimetre waves they have a much shorter range than mobile phone signals, which means they fade after travelling just a short distance. 

According to The Guardian, Google’s Skybender tests at Spaceport America in New Mexico found that a broadcast at 28GHz would fade in around a tenth the distance of a 4G phone signal.

But that isn’t stopping Google. Most of the details of the project have been kept secret

As Rudell says an educated guess would be that they’re trying to figure out how to use a team of high-flying drones to beam down focussed '5G' transmissions in a phased array configuration. “This is very difficult, very complex and burns a lot of power," he says.

According to Engadget, Google has gained permission from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to continue testing their drones in US airspace till July this year, which is more likely when more information will be released.

 

Original source: Science Alert

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