none

FOOD MANUFACTURERS ARE TOO SWEET

25-07-2017
by 
in 
Does Australia need tighter regulations around food manufacturing?

With the vast majority of packaged foods containing added sugar, and Heinz under fire for branding highly sugary processed food as 'healthy fruit snacks', the Australian food market may be about to undergo an overhaul. 

Calls for changes to regulation around the labeling and inclusion of added sugar in food products have been coming fast, as the Federal Court considers Heinz's alleged misleading conduct,  claiming a snack that contains nearly 70 percent sugar was a healthy food for toddlers. 

Heinz promotes Shredz as being "99 percent fruit and veg" and a way to introduce toddlers to healthy eating.  

But in its trial opening in Adelaide, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission told the court a nutritional expert has labelled the product as a confectionery more in line with junk food than fruit. 

Lawyer Tom Duggan said the product is predominantly made from fruit juice concentrate and pastes, while Heinz presented Shredz as a healthy food with the same nutritional value as fresh fruit and vegetables. 

"Apple juice concentrate is a form of added sugar... this is not a nutritious alternative to fruit and vegetables, as displayed on the packaging," he said. 

"Good sugars are an integral part of a healthy diet, and we need to be able to separate sugars naturally present in dairy, fruits and vegetables from sugars added during manufacturing," said George Institute for Global Health at the University of NSW's Professor Bruce Neal.

The institute conducted the study which found almost 70% of packaged foods contained added sugar, analysing over 34,000 packaged foods. 

''Added sugars are empty calories and a major contributing factor to the obesity epidemic and tooth decay," he said.

Researchers analysed more than 34,000 packaged foods - more than 18,000 discretionary foods and nearly 16,000 core foods like milk, bread and cheese.

Based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines, a significantly higher proportion of discretionary foods contained added sugar compared to core foods, 87 per cent versus 52 per cent.

Currently, just over half of Australians consume more sugar than is recommended, and the country has one of the highest rates of obesity in the world. 

Many lobby groups insist that better, clearer labeling is key to reducing the negative impact on Australian consumers. 

Related news & editorials

  1. 07.03.2021
    07.03.2021
    by      In
    If shopping for the latest items on the shelves excites you, then you have something in common with one of Australia’s leading manufacturing advocate.
     Dr Kymberley Talbot says she has a “blackbelt in shopping,”  but she is also Managing Director of the lithium-ion battery developer company, FELINE... Read More
  2. ‘The YARDS’ precinct in Kemps Creek promises to be a benchmark in Australian industrial development and cements the region as a key distribution hub in New South Wales.
    04.03.2021
    04.03.2021
    by      In , In
    A $1 billion major industrial and logistics community project is set to begin construction in Western Sydney.
    ‘The YARDS’ precinct in Kemps Creek promises to be a benchmark in Australian industrial development and cements the region as a key distribution hub in New South Wales.
    The project is... Read More
  3. Karen Andrews
    04.03.2021
    04.03.2021
    by      In , In
    Australia’s rare earths and critical minerals were described as leading global assets, in a new grant program announced today from Tomago in the NSW Hunter region. 
    These comments were made as Minister for Industry, Science and Technology Karen Andrews, along with Prime Minister Scott Morrison,... Read More
  4. Editor Barry O’Hagan
    04.03.2021
    04.03.2021
    by      In , In
    Industry Update would like to give a warm welcome to our new editor, Barry O’Hagan.
    Barry brings a wealth of experience to the role, having worked as a media professional for more than 25 years.
    A former newspaper and magazine journalist, he has a passion for telling the stories of businesses and... Read More
Products
Suppliers