none

Fair Work act needs extreme makeover

31-08-2010
by 
in 
Fair Work act needs extreme makeover
The previous Labor Government under Julia Gillard’s watch promised to modernise workplace awards for the benefit of employers and employees.
 
By replacing multiple state and federal awards, Ms Gillard assured us it would lessen the burden on business.
 
But talk to any small business owner today and they will tell you the reverse is the case.
 
Labor’s new Fair Work laws have brought greater complexity, greater uncertainty, greater inflexibility and greater costs.
 
The regulations are so complex that most employers can't work them out.
 
In short, they’ve been a disaster for job security and job creation.
 
They have effectively strangled employers and killed any incentives to employ additional full-time staff.
 
There is now a growing number of skilled people who can't find full-time work because 40 per cent of new jobs are casual or contract.
 
And horror stories are emerging where small businesses are being forced into bankruptcy or are suffering severe financial strain because of vexatious and often spurious claims by “aggrieved” employees.
 
The new Fair Work laws have caused an explosion in litigation. In the law's first full year of operation, the number of formal cases lodged with Fair Work Australia leapt 110 per cent to more than 37,000 cases. Under the new laws, the onus of proof has been reversed – employers are GUILTY until proven INNOCENT.
 
The only winners are industrial lawyers, whose numbers are mushrooming daily.
 
The Australian Industry Group, set up to protect the interests of Australian industry, has identified some 120 areas where union power has increased under the Fair Work Act.
 
Chief executive Innes Willox has repeatedly warned Government that the bill fails to address issues of real concern to Australian business.
 
Mr Willox says the absence of any attempt at balance is glaring. Senator Eric Abetz, while opposition spokesman on industrial relations, was an outspoken critic of the legislation.
 
Now, as Minister for Employment in the Abbott Government we urge him to review this divisive legislation as a priority.

Related news & editorials

  1. 15.03.2019
    15.03.2019
    by      In
    Thankfully the days of child labour are long gone in Australia, yet it remains a global scandal, with World Vision estimating that there are still around 73 million child labourers worldwide between the ages of five and 11.
    However, the latest statistics suggest that the youngest members of our... Read More
  2. 20.02.2019
    20.02.2019
    by      In
    These are exciting times at Industry Update. As you can plainly see, the magazine is becoming ever more popular with our advertisers as well as our readers, and we are expecting to publish a record number of pages this year.
    At the same time, our video channel really is going from strength to... Read More
  3. 19.11.2018
    19.11.2018
    by      In
    Thankfully, the doom and gloom so long predicted by the naysayers has not come to pass.
    Australian manufacturing has continued to confound the critics during 2018 with robust growth throughout the year. It has done this in spite of the domestic backdrop of rising energy costs and amid the... Read More
  4. 21.09.2018
    21.09.2018
    by      In
    Much has been written about the problems facing small businesses, and in just about every survey cashflow is identified as one of the key problems faced. In Australia, at any given time, there is around $26 billion in unpaid debts owed to small businesses.
    However, the situation is improving, and... Read More