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EXPORT GRANT HELPS BRING CARBON CAPTURE TO CEMENT MANUFACTURE

31-01-2018
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in 
Belgian cement works
The cement industry accounts for 7% of global CO2 emissions

Australian technology company, Calix, has secured EUR3.4 million in working capital from Efic to build the CO2 capture facility for the Low Emissions Intensity Lime and Cement (LEILAC) project in Belgium.

Efic, the Australian Government’s export credit agency, is a specialist financier that delivers simple and creative solutions for Australian exporters. Its aim is to assist Australian businesses by helping them to win business, grow internationally, and achieve export success.

Calix engineers and scientists are leading the LEILAC project, which is a European-Australian collaboration, and includes a consortium of some of the world’s largest cement, lime, and engineering companies, as well as leading research and environmental institutions.

According to Calix CFO Darren Charles, “As an Australian company developing technology with global applications, the support of government organisations such as Efic is critical in ensuring our success”.

The cement industry around the world accounts for as much as 7% of global CO2 emissions, making it one of the largest industrial contributors. And the lime sector has the dubious honour of the highest CO2 intensity relative to turnover.

Around 60% of the CO2 emissions from both cement and lime plants are released directly from the chemical reaction in the production process.

Calix’s technology uses indirect heating, so the CO2 and furnace combustion gases do not mix. This re-engineering of the existing process captures almost pure CO2 released from the limestone without significant additional costs or increased energy use.

The technology is complementary with other carbon capture methods already developed in the power and cement sector, such as oxyfuel, and can make use of alternative fuels.

“The pilot plant will let cement and lime industries reduce their CO2 emissions dramatically without significant energy or capital penalty,” says Charles.

Calix has previously won funding from both the UK (DECC) and EU (ASCENT Project) to develop its Endex reactor technology, which offers significant opportunities for energy-generation organisations seeking to reduce CO2 emissions.

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