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DEMONSTRATING THE FUTURE OF COLLABORATIVE ROBOTS AT NMW

03-05-2019
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in 

The future of manufacturing will be led by collaborative technologies. However, the Australian manufacturing sector has been slow to expand on traditional robotic automation and move towards ‘Industry 5.0’, which will see people and technology working together more closely than ever before.

Universal Robots, a pioneer and global market leader in the collaborative robot (cobot) sector, will continue to drive this transformation when it showcases collaborative workforce solutions at National Manufacturing Week 2019 at the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre from 14th to 17th May.

At the event, Universal Robots will present its latest product range, the e-Series, including a new application for modern manufacturing businesses with a small-scale palletising display. It will also demonstrate collaborative ‘pick and place’ processes, one of the top three applications for cobots in Australia. These will feature the latest advancements in conveyor tracking, vision robot guidance and mobile automated guided vehicles for easy manufacturing solutions.

Recently appointed Asia-Pacific Regional Sales Director James McKew will be present for the first time. With a strong track record leading businesses in the industrial automation segment, he brings many years of experience and customer focus to the team. He will be supported by the local team, led by Australia and New Zealand Country Manager Peter Hern and including Channel Development Manager Darrell Adams and Regional Technical Support Engineer Ian Choo.

“The work that Universal Robots is doing continues to empower the manufacturers into the future as we continue to define what great collaborative automation looks like,” says McKew. “UR’s collaborative robots are thriving across Australia and New Zealand, and more businesses than ever are realising their potential. It’s an exciting time to be working in the sector, and we can already see real change starting to happen. With such a growing, competitive landscape, businesses need to step up to the next level, and we are showing off what that looks like.”

Hern adds, “The showcase at National Manufacturing Week 2019 will be a great opportunity for people who haven’t seen our collaborative robots in action before. There are so many applications for cobots in modern manufacturing businesses, and we hope to show off their potential at the event.”

The showcase highlights the company’s global commitment to creating a more accessible robotics industry and follows the establishment of new Universal Robots Authorised Training Centres designed to teach hands-on skills for real-life cobot applications. This programme aims to address the current skills gap and drive interest in automation. 

Universal Robots
+65 6635 7270
www.universal-robots.com

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