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Cutting-edge signage solutions

20-09-2011
by 
in 

Signs need to deliver a clear message to avoid confusion, which is why all signs are custom-made to help brands inform, instruct and look good in all the right places.

Melbourne-based Signcraft Group designs and manufactures its complete range of signage solutions in-house, and the company’s Advanced Robotic Technology (ART) CNC routers offer the high-quality cutting capabilities Signcraft needs to be competitive.

Every company needs to make people and customers aware of its location and products, make its messaging prominent, identify ownership or help people get from A to B.

And because we live in a very visual world, all those and many more companies, organisations or road networks have one common need: Signs.

Signs need to deliver a clear message to avoid confusion, which is why all signs are custom-made to help brands inform, instruct and look good in all the right places.

Melbourne-based Signcraft Group understands people and the way they respond to information and instructions in diverse environments and evolved from a tradition sign shop to become a signage specialist encompassing different trades and services to become Australia's leading signage organisation.

The company runs a vast range of fabrication machines, guillotines, presses, welders, vacuum forming machines for 3D moulds, as well as two Advanced Robotic Technology (ART) routers. New technologies and new materials are transforming the way signs are designed and manufactured.

CNC routers are designed to keep up with these developments and excel at cutting composite prototyping boards, plastics, carbon fibre and even non-ferrous metals with the proper accessories.

In the past, CNC routers have primarily been used to cut contours and 3D shapes in wood, plastic and foam for signs, plaques and more. Over the years, however, routers have become more accurate and capable and are used more and more to machine parts that were once machined on CNC milling machines.

The larger machine table sizes of today’s routers, coupled with the high-speed spindles, makes them an ideal choice for machining thin and small parts from sheet or plate material.

Advanced Robotic Technology (ART) Pty Ltd
Ph: 07 3393 6555 
www.advancedrobotic.com

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