none

CAR COMPONENT MAKER CHANGES LANES TO SOLAR FUTURE

12-06-2015
by 
in 

CSIRO’s solar technology has been exported to Japan in a move that further demonstrates the viability of solar as an international trade industry for Australia.

Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS), which received funding from the Japanese Ministry of the Environment to “develop and verify technologies for enhancing measures to reduce carbon dioxide emissions,” will establish a field of 150 heliostats in Yokohama to run research projects.

The project is also a welcome boost to the car industry, with the CSIRO-designed heliostats being constructed by a South Australian manufacturing company actively coping with the downturn in the automotive industry.

Heliostat SA was created with the support of four South Australian companies: Precision Components, a company heavily involved in the car industry; The University of South Australia; May Brothers and Enersalt.

It is the second international deployment of CSIRO’s solar thermal technology, following on from a similar project in Cyprus.

CSIRO’s Energy and Resources Executive Director Dr Alex Wonhas said the two projects were a strong vote of confidence for the science agency’s solar capabilities.

“These projects are the fruits of more than a decade of solar thermal research emanating from our energy centre in Newcastle and demonstrate the growing worldwide appetite for concentrated solar power,” Dr Wonhas said. 


“To have CSIRO’s heliostats selected by MHPS, a global leader in energy, proves that our technology is up there with the best in the world. Our successful collaboration with Heliostat SA also shows the benefits of science working closely with industry to create value for the Australian economy.”



Minister for Industry and Science Ian Macfarlane last week visited the plant operated by Heliostat SA at Beverley, in Adelaide’s western suburbs.

The Australian Government provided $1 million of matched funding from its Automotive Diversification Program to Precision Components, which enabled the car manufacturer to diversify into renewable energy.

Solar thermal tower technology uses a field of mirrors whose angle is under computer control (heliostats), each of which rotates accurately to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto a receiver on top of a tower.

In this application the concentrated sunlight is used to create superheated steam, which can then be used to drive a turbine for generating electricity. 
 


Energy can be stored cheaply as heat in solar thermal systems, giving this technology great potential for medium to large scale power, even when the sun isn’t shining.


The CSIRO heliostat design is unique. It is smaller than conventional heliostats, and uses an advanced control system to get high performance from a relatively inexpensive design.

For more information visit: www.csiro.au/en/Research/EF/Areas/Solar/Solar-thermal

Related news & editorials

  1. 22.09.2021
    22.09.2021
    by      In
    The Northern Territory (NT) Government in partnership with the Advanced Manufacturing Growth Centre (AMGC) has opened applications to the total $7.5 million Advanced Manufacturing Ecosystem Fund (AMEF) as appreciation for local manufacturing rises in the Territory.
    The Fund delivers on the... Read More
  2. 22.09.2021
    22.09.2021
    by      In
    Towns split by interstate borders are used to living as one community so industries and businesses on the border face unique challenges.
    Therefore, The Victorian Government will deploy a team of locally based ‘Border Brokers’ to support industries and businesses impacted by restrictions on Victoria... Read More
  3. 22.09.2021
    22.09.2021
    by      In
    Popular snack foods; Kettle Chips, Thins, Cheezels and CC’s could soon be manufactured in a new premises in the Western suburbs.
    A $222 million development proposal could see the Snack Brands Australia warehouse and distribution centre on Distribution Drive in Orchard Hills expanded to include food... Read More
  4. 20.09.2021
    20.09.2021
    by      In
    Boeing and RMIT are joining forces in an exciting collaboration to develop local solutions for the manufacturing of space equipment.
    “Australia’s burgeoning space sector requires the production of complex, low volume, bespoke components not suited to conventional manufacturing techniques,” Boeing... Read More
Products
Suppliers