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BID TO MAKE MELBOURNE’S TRAMS SOLAR-POWERED

12-06-2015
by 
in 

A company has submitted a bold new proposal to the Victorian Government, which would see Melbourne’s iconic tram network run entirely on solar power within a few years.

Under the proposal, the public transport network would be run by energy generated at two new solar farms built near Swan Hill and Mildura, in the state's north-west.

Together these proposed farms would be capable of generating the 80 gigawatt-hours of electricity a year needed to run the tram network, which is the largest in the world.

According to the Australian Solar Group – the company behind the bid – if approved, the plan would cut 100,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions a year. Impressively, it also wouldn't increase the cost of public transport in the city.

“It was a condition given to us as part of the mission that we couldn’t increase the cost of commuting,” Dave Holland, a co-founder of the Australian Solar Group, told RenewEconomy, a sustainability newsletter.

“We modelled historical contracted and future prices … and (the result of) this has been one of the driving forces behind the project.”

The company has already invested $3 million into the project, and has another $70 million secured to build the solar farms, which they'll spend if the government-owned Public Transport Victoria commits to purchasing their energy for the next 20 years.

Relatively speaking, trams are already a pretty efficient form of public transport, but the fact that the electricity they require currently comes from burning coal means that they're still responsible for substantial emissions. 

The alternative to this, the Australian Solar Group believes, is two 20 MW solar farms set on 80 hectare plots, which use 130,000 photovoltaic panels to track the Sun throughout the day.

Their proposed Swan Hill site already has full approval for the farm to be built, and the permits are underway for Mildura, according to Holland. 

“The first site is ready to go, we could literally start site works immediately … within the week,” he told RenewEconomy.

Construction would take around six months, he predicts. 

Once up and running, the two solar farms would feed energy into the grid, which would offset the power demands from the tram network.

According to the Melbourne Age, Transport Minister Terry Mulder sent a letter to the Melbourne city council last October saying that it was interested in the project as it fitted in with its environmental goals, but that the proposal had to be: "measured against the availability of brown coal and natural gas that for many years have given Victoria a relatively cheap source of energy".

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