A massive struggle in medical technology is growing replacement nerve cells for use in regenerative therapy. Now, like with many other challenges, 3D printing might come to the rescue. 

Scientists in Australia have used a 3D printer to create nerve cells found in the brain using a "bio-ink" made from stem cells.

The research brings technology a step closer to making replacement brain tissue derived from a patient's own skin or blood cells to help treat conditions such as brain injury, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia.

The bio-ink is made of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), which are capable of growing to replace any kind of cell in the body (much like stem cell), and possibly form replacement body tissues and even whole organs, given the right environment. 

Jeremy Crook, who led the research, said the ability to customise brain tissue from a person's own body tissue was better for transplantation. 

Dr Crook said many neuropsychiatric disorders result from an imbalance of key chemicals called neurotransmitters, which are produced by specific nerve cells in the brain.

For example, he said, defective serotonin and GABA-producing nerve cells are implicated in schizophrenia and epilepsy while defective dopamine-producing cells are implicated in Parkinson's disease.

The team used 3D printing to make neurones involved in producing GABA and serotonin, as well as support cells called neuroglia, they reported in the journal Advanced Healthcare Material.

In the future, they plan to print neurones that produce dopamine.

"We might want to make a tissue that specifically generates that neurotransmitter for grafting into the brain of a Parkinson's patient," said Dr Crook.
"That's absolutely achievable."

To make the neurones, Dr Crook and colleagues used their bio-ink to print layers of a hatched pattern to create a 5 millimetre-sized cube.

They then "crosslinked" the cube into a firm jelly-like substance.

Growth factors and nutrients were then fed into the holes of this spongey "scaffold", encouraging the stem cells to grow and turn into neurons and support cells, linking up to form tissue. Waste was also removed via the holes in the scaffold.

Dr Crook said once scaled up, blood vessels would be needed, but small transplants could be theoretically possible using the tissue developed so far.

Related news & editorials

  1. 16.03.2018
    by      In
    The Omron S8VK-S series is billed as one of the world’s most compact DIN rail power supplies, and so is ideal for smaller control panels. The compact body size enables side-by-side mounting, which enhances design flexibility and reduces installation area by 30% compared with previous Omron power... Read More
  2. 16.03.2018
    by      In
    Rittal Australia has confirmed its national distribution partnership with APS Industrial, the newly formed specialist electrical industrial and automation equipment distributor.
    APS Industrial includes the existing businesses of Ramelec and HiTech – two well established Australian distributors,... Read More
  3. 15.03.2018
    by      In
    At just 6mm wide by 106mm high, the PTCB electronic circuit breaker from Phoenix Contact provides space saving circuit protection.
    The smart device protects 24V DC loads against overloads and short circuits. It can be used as a stand-alone circuit breaker or combined with the company’s Clipline DIN... Read More
  4. 15.03.2018
    by      In
    The Yawei Nisshinbo HPE Series from Applied Machinery is the latest in servo-driven Turret Punch Presses, providing high-end performance and power savings. 
    A technology partnership between Yawei and Nisshinbo to produce these CNC turret punch presses has been a massive success.
    Using German made... Read More