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Workshop on fall prevention

31-08-2010
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in 

 

A workshop at the WA Safety Show will detail the changes under a soon to be released Code of Practice for Managing The Risk Of Falls At Workplaces.

Carl Sachs of fall prevention advisory and installation firm Workplace Access & Safety will explain the implications for workplaces and how to prepare for a new era in safe work at heights.

The free workshop belongs to a series of industry seminars sponsored by Workplace Access & Safety over the three days of the show from August 7 to 9.

Among the headline changes under the new falls prevention code are a dismantling of the 2m high rule, compulsory ladder inspections, tougher conditions for the use of harnesses, and the mandating of Australian Standards.

Mr Sachs says the new code will affect the choices workplaces make when it comes to fall prevention equipment.

"The 2m limit is about to be replaced with an obligation to minimise the likelihood of a fall from any height. In real terms, the law will encompass falls from low level platforms and ladders."

"Another new requirement is that of regular inspection of ladders and maintenance. This may increase the cost of ladder use and is likely to steer users towards higher order controls like scaffold and elevated working platforms."

"Nor does the code pull any punches when it comes to suspension trauma. Self rescue is no longer an option and nobody should use a fall arrest system unless there is at least one other person on site to rescue them if they fall. Apart from the costs of training, supervision and rescue equipment, this significantly increases the labour cost of working in a harness.

Workplace Access & Safety will present the fall prevention workshop twice during the WA Safety Show on August 7 and 8.

For more information, visit: workplaceaccess.com.au or call 1300 552 984.

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