none
none

NEW CHIEF SCIENTIST SET TO DRIVE INNOVATION AGENDA

26-01-2016
by 
in 

Dr Alan Finkel, a renowned engineer, neuroscientist, entrepreneur and philanthropist, has begun his three-year term as Australia’s Chief Scientist.

Dr Finkel succeeds Professor Ian Chubb, who served in the role for almost five years.

The Chief Scientist provides independent advice to the Government on science, technology and innovation. They also play a key role in linking scientific research and commercialisation.

Dr Finkel will also be heavily involved in the ongoing implementation of the Government’s National Innovation and Science Agenda.

The Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, Christopher Pyne, welcomed Dr Finkel to the role.

Mr Pyne is looking forward to working with Dr Finkel to promote science and innovation in Australia.

“Dr Finkel has been a passionate advocate for Australian science and innovation for more than three decades. He is also one of Australia’s great entrepreneurs,” Mr Pyne said.

“Science, innovation and commercialisation are at the heart of the Government’s agenda and I am delighted we have a person of the calibre of Dr Finkel to lead the national conversation on the importance of science, innovation and turning great Australian ideas into great Australian products.”

Mr Pyne said the Government is committed to fostering a culture in which science and business work hand in glove to create jobs and growth.

He commended Professor Chubb for his “remarkable contribution to science in this country.”

“I commend his vision, leadership and insight. As Chief Scientist, Professor Chubb was a tireless advocate for boosting Australia’s skills and capabilities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and was instrumental in identifying strategic research priorities for the nation,” Mr Pyne said.

“I thank him for his important contribution to a whole-of-government, strategic approach to science in Australia.”

Dr Finkel is Australia’s eighth Chief Scientist since the role was established in 1989. He was most recently Chancellor of Monash University and President of the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering (formerly ATSE).

Related news & editorials

  1. 21.11.2017
    21.11.2017
    by      In
    Darcy Ewing of Kurrupt Kustoms in Albury NSW was running compressed air from a 6-year-old reciprocating piston-style compressor when (in his own words) it virtually “S*** itself!”.
    This left his high-end auto body and customisation shop in real trouble with a total shutdown of all essential... Read More
  2. 21.11.2017
    21.11.2017
    by      In
    If the recent upheavals in Australian manufacturing illustrate one truth, it is the absolute necessity for forward planning, and more to the point, the importance of planning for growth – regardless of a company’s existing size.
    While the ambition to grow a manufacturing operation is one thing,... Read More
  3. 21.11.2017
    21.11.2017
    by      In
    Blockchain technology was invented to make the world’s first crypto-currency, Bitcoin, possible. Traditional currencies rely on intermediaries like governments, banks and clearing houses to guarantee their value and process transactions. Bitcoin uses digital technologies to cut out these middlemen... Read More
  4. 21.11.2017
    21.11.2017
    by      In
    Australian Tank Engineering (ATE Tankers) has been engineering and manufacturing tankers in Australia for nearly two decades. But whereas most vehicle manufacturers have seen sales decline in recent years, ATE has elevated itself through the trend with a transformative mindset that has enabled the... Read More