none
none

NATIONAL MOTOR MUSEUM ROLLS ON

26-09-2017
by 
in 
the australian motor museum, with vintage cars parked outside

It's sad days for the Australian motor manufacturing industry, as international brands close down their local manufacturing plants and move overseas. 

To remember what once was, and commemorate the efforts and successes of on-shore manufacturing, the National Motor Museum has captured the last days of big-brand Australian automotive manufacturing in its new exhibition: [Re]Assembled, a history of Australian automotive manufacturing.

National Motor Museum Director Paul Rees said the permanent exhibit, which opened this previous weekend, was curated with a keen awareness of the public sensitivity surrounding the impending Holden plant closure in South Australia.

“The installation was a true collaboration between the National Motor Museum’s curation team and GM Holden and came about through conversations about what could be done to capture the moment of the closure of the last automotive manufacturing assembly plant in Australia,” he said.

Supported by the South Australian Government, the innovative exhibition features history-making moments in Australian automotive manufacturing.

Rees said a highlight of the exhibit is the six Holden vehicles in various stages of completion hung on an assembly line from the museum ceiling.

“It’s the only display of its kind in the world. No other motoring or transport focussed museum in the world has tackled the engineering challenge of suspending so many vehicles from its ceiling,” he said.

“The display is also highly immersive with the aim for visitors to get a real understanding and feel for what it was like working in a manufacturing plant.”

One of the prized Holden models will be the signature Holden VF Commodore built at the soon-to-close Elizabeth plant in South Australia and signed by the Holden workers from the plant.

Rees said the exhibition highlights the automotive industry’s great history in Australia.

“[Re]Assembled focuses our attention on the history and the people behind the story of automotive manufacturing,” he said.

“The exhibition is built for generations to come and is the story of our great automotive manufacturing history.”

“At one point around one in six Australians were employed by it [the automotive manufacturing industry] and almost all Australians have owned or loved a Holden, a Ford, a Mitsubishi, a Chrysler,” said Bolognese.

“South Australia in particular has played a big part in the industry ever since the late 1800s.”

The opening of the exhibition on Sunday, September 24 coincided with the Bay to Birdwood, one of the largest South Australian motoring events for veteran, vintage and classic vehicles. 

Related news & editorials

  1. DrumBlaster in use
    12.12.2017
    12.12.2017
    by      In
    An Australian innovation is starting to garner success at home and abroad, with increasing numbers of export orders for DrumBlaster. The company’s innovative buildup control technology system virtually eliminates residual concrete buildup in ready mix truck drums.
    “It is gratifying that after five... Read More
  2. 12.12.2017
    12.12.2017
    by      In
    A major new research centre aims to transform Australia's automotive industry by developing new lightweight materials and manufacturing technologies, making cars more fuel-efficient and reducing carbon dioxide emissions.
    The ARC Training Centre in Lightweight Automotive Structures (ATLAS) has been... Read More
  3. 12.12.2017
    12.12.2017
    by      In
    South Australia has rated in the world’s top three places to explore for oil and gas in a newly released global survey by the Fraser Institute in Canada.
    The respected public policy think tank asks petroleum industry executives each year for their views about barriers to investment in jurisdictions... Read More
  4. 12.12.2017
    12.12.2017
    by      In
    Mineral explorers and researchers from around the world will gain an unprecedented look at rocks from deep below the world-famous Nullarbor Plain.
    The Geological Survey of South Australia (GSSA ) will display 12 trays of drill core rom the South Australian Government’s $3 million PACE Copper... Read More