none
none

Fair Work changes ‘unfair and unacceptable’

31-08-2010
by 
in 
Fair Work changes ‘unfair and unacceptable’

The federal government decision to press ahead with expanded union entry rights to workplaces is unfair for businesses and non-union members, says the Australian Industry Group.  

The Fair Work Amendment Bill 2013 would give union officials the right to hold their meetings in lunchrooms regardless of whether or not any union members are employed by a business.

AiGroup Chief Executive Innes Willox described the Bill as “unbalanced and unacceptable.”

He said it is particularly disappointing Independent Tony Windsor MP did not follow through a public commitment to oppose further changes to labour laws which did not have the support of both major parties.

“With only 100 days to go until the federal election, major changes to workplace relations laws which will have negative effects on competitiveness and jobs should not be entertained,” Mr Willox said.

Mr Willox said it was fortunate the Government finally abandoned proposals to impose compulsory arbitration on employers during bargaining, which were very strongly opposed by the Australian Industry Group and other business groups.

Related news & editorials

  1. 21.11.2017
    21.11.2017
    by      In
    Darcy Ewing of Kurrupt Kustoms in Albury NSW was running compressed air from a 6-year-old reciprocating piston-style compressor when (in his own words) it virtually “S*** itself!”.
    This left his high-end auto body and customisation shop in real trouble with a total shutdown of all essential... Read More
  2. 21.11.2017
    21.11.2017
    by      In
    If the recent upheavals in Australian manufacturing illustrate one truth, it is the absolute necessity for forward planning, and more to the point, the importance of planning for growth – regardless of a company’s existing size.
    While the ambition to grow a manufacturing operation is one thing,... Read More
  3. 21.11.2017
    21.11.2017
    by      In
    Blockchain technology was invented to make the world’s first crypto-currency, Bitcoin, possible. Traditional currencies rely on intermediaries like governments, banks and clearing houses to guarantee their value and process transactions. Bitcoin uses digital technologies to cut out these middlemen... Read More
  4. 21.11.2017
    21.11.2017
    by      In
    Australian Tank Engineering (ATE Tankers) has been engineering and manufacturing tankers in Australia for nearly two decades. But whereas most vehicle manufacturers have seen sales decline in recent years, ATE has elevated itself through the trend with a transformative mindset that has enabled the... Read More