none
none

EDUCATION IS THE KEY TO ACCEPTANCE OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING

08-12-2016
by 
in 

Increasing numbers of manufacturing companies are considering the introduction of workforce drug and alcohol testing. However, such test regimes can cause friction between companies and their workers, and lead to workers refusing tests and sites not meeting regulatory compliance. This can reduce productivity or lead to a less safe workplace.

As with any business, it takes time to put together a formal policy - especially over something as complex as drugs and alcohol in the workplace. But once the policy is in place, you need to let the workforce know what the expectations are – not every worker will know all the details of WHS legislation!

To solve this potential conflict, Medvet recommends educating all workers about drugs and alcohol, and your plans to address them. There are two types of education that should be considered for any size of company.

The first is employee awareness. Let your team know how drugs and alcohol impact them: not just accidents or near misses involving machinery and vehicles, but also the short- and long-term impacts.

If you do begin testing, then your workforce should understand the exact process. If they do know what to expect the process will run more smoothly and reduce the hours billed by your testing provider. Your workforce will also spend less time off the job.

Medvet also recommends using sessions to let everyone know policy specifics. If everyone knows your policy, everyone has the opportunity to meet expectations.

The second area for education is at the supervisor level. “Reasonable cause” training can help supervisors spot both the physical and behavioural effects of drugs and alcohol in their teams. Not everyone shows the same signs, so a keen eye is needed to tell if a worker is or has been under the influence, and is potentially making the workplace unsafe.

This kind of training can also help supervisors know how to record their suspicions, how to approach workers they suspect might be unsafe, and how to get workers the appropriate help. It’s not about punishment for using drugs; it’s about staying healthy.

When your workforce understands drugs and alcohol, the testing process becomes easier. Making it easier to test will help make your factory a safer workplace.

Medvet
www.medvet.com.au

Related news & editorials

  1. 21.09.2017
    21.09.2017
    by      In
    A NSW defence engineering company has partnered with an Israeli defence systems leader to deliver Australian production and assembly of Spike missiles.
    The Spike is an Israeli-designed missile, built to target and track armor and infantry targets. 
    Varley Australia will create a state-of-the-art... Read More
  2. 21.09.2017
    21.09.2017
    by      In
    It would be an understatement to say that Australia's NBN rollout has been fraught with delays and dissapointments. 
    Politics, changes in management, and technological hurdles have lead to a slower implementation than was initially predicted. Many households on the NBN are not recieving speeds that... Read More
  3. A red holden ute
    21.09.2017
    21.09.2017
    by      In
    With the closure of big automotive manufacturing plants, thousands of Australian workers have been displaced. Hundreds of them are yet to find new work. 
    Approximately 950 Holden employees remain at the factory in Adelaide's north. Yet, with just over a month until its final close, many are yet to... Read More
  4. Paddy Neumann works on the Neumann ion drive.
    21.09.2017
    21.09.2017
    by      In
    In a warehouse hidden away in the inner suburbs of Adelaide, there's a great deal of work being done, and it's all about space. 
    “The short answer is, it is rocket science,” says Dr Paddy Neumann, the founder and driving force behind the Neumann Space initiative. 
    Out of this location comes all... Read More