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Aussie made needs more than just lip service

31-08-2010
by 
in 
Aussie made needs more than just lip service
The Australian Made campaign has been one of this country’s great success stories.
 
Since the mid-80s the campaign has been urging locals and consumers globally to Buy Australian.
 
This worthy campaign not only helps to promote local products and companies – it helps to protect jobs.
 
The strong Australian dollar combined with the significant challenges of soaring energy prices and cheap imports have left many industrial sectors struggling for survival.
 
The parlous state of manufacturing in Australia was highlighted by the recent decision by Ford Australia to cease local operations – a decision that sent shockwaves through the industry.
 
Supporting Australian companies and buying Australian made products has never been more critical.
 
The not-for-profit Australian Made campaign has done an outstanding job to re-enforce this message.
 
But it operates on a limited budget, with little help from government.
 
The bulk of its funds are raised through license fees. When Australian companies are able to meet certain criteria, they earn the proud honor of displaying the famous kangaroo Australian Made symbol.
 
Incredibly, the federal government provides no funding to assist the Australian Made campaign to spread its core message.
 
The federal government has always acknowledged the exceptional role played by the Australian Made campaign in promoting local products.
 
But paying lip service is not enough – it’s time to open the purse strings.
 
While the government found nearly $150 million to promote Australian tourism in the May budget, it could not scrape any funds together to promote Australian products.
 
The campaign is not looking for a King’s ransom. They need a miserly $3 million over three years to run strategic programs with local industry groups and conduct effective marketing campaigns globally.
 
Australian Made is not looking for a government handout – it’s an investment in our future. 
 
More and more Australian companies are now proudly promoting the fact that their products are Australian – it’s time for government to get behind them.

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